The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC, Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato

The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC, Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato

The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC, Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato

The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC, Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato

Elite 201

Carthage is now best known as Rome's enemy during the three Punic Wars, but for several centuries the city was the dominant power in the Western Mediterranean, with possessions across North Africa, on Sicily and Sardinia and in Spain.

I liked the decision not to include the Punic Wars in the selection of campaigns and battles. Instead we look at the conquest of Sardinia, one of the many Carthaginian battles on Sicily, and the costly Mercenary War, a revolt that came between the First and Second Punic Wars and threatened Carthage's position in Africa.

Inevitably over a period this lengthy Carthage's military changed in many ways. The Carthaginian element became less important as time went on, and Allied and Mercenary forces began to dominate. Here we get short sections each of the main contributors to the Carthaginian army, including their African, Spanish and Celtic troops, followed by a look at the arms and equipment of the army, once again with sections on the different types of mercenaries. There is also a very quick look at the Carthaginian navy, the most important part of her power for most of this period.

The author really knows his material, and that comes across in the text, which is readable but packed with information. The text is supported by a series of very good photographs. As always in an Osprey volume there are good colour plates, and I like the system used here, where the colour plates are spread through the text, and accompanied by their notes to the alternative with all of the colour plates in a single section and notes at the end of the book.

Chapters
Historical Reputation
Chronology
Organization
Tactics
Arms & Equipment
Clothing & Physical Appearance
The Navy
Selected Campaigns & Battles

Author: Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 62
Publisher: Osprey
Year: 2014



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Between the reigns of Augustus and Septimius Severus, the Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire frequently saw brutal fighting, most notably during the conquest of Dacia by Trajan, the suppression of the Great Revolt in Judea and intermittent clashes with Rome's great rival Parthia. In these wars, Roman soldiers had to fight in a range of different climates and terrains, from the deserts of the Middle East to the islands of the eastern Mediterranean.

Using full-colour artwork, this book examines the variation of equipment and uniforms both between different military units, and in armies stationed in different regions of the Empire. Using evidence drawn from recent archaeological finds, it paints a vivid portrait of Roman army units in the Eastern provinces in the first two centuries of the Imperial period.

Roman unit standards played a important role, both ceremonially and on the battlefield. With the armies of the late Roman Republic and early Empire continually engaged on the frontiers, the soldiers selected for the dangerous honour of carrying them were figures of particular renown and splendour.

Standard-bearers wore special armour, with the heads and pelts of animals such as bears, wolves, or even lions draped over their helmets and shoulders. The standards themselves varied greatly, from the legion's Eagle and imperial portrait image to various cohort signa, flags (vexilla) and even dragon 'windsocks' (dracones) copied from barbarian enemies and allies.

This first volume of a two-part series by Roman army expert, Rafaele D'Amato uses detailed colour plates and the latest research to examine these vital cogs in the Roman army machine that drove its soldiers to conquer the known world.

Preceding and simultaneously with the conquest of England by Duke William, other ambitious and aggressive Norman noblemen (notably the Drengot, De Hauteville and Guiscard families) found it prudent to leave Normandy. At first taking mercenary employment with Lombard rulers then fighting the Byzantine Empire in southern Italy, many of these noblemen achieved great victories, acquired rich lands of their own, and perfected a feudal military system that lasted for 200 years. As news of the rich pickings to be had in the south spread in Normandy, they were joined by many other opportunists – typically, younger sons who could not inherit lands at home. Steadily, these Norman noblemen fought their way to local power, at first in Apulia, then across the Adriatic in Albania, and finally in Muslim Sicily, defeating in the process the armies of Byzantium, the German 'Holy Roman Empire', and Islamic regional rulers. Finally, in 1130, Roger II founded a unified kingdom incorporating southern Italy and Sicily, which lasted until the death of Tancred of Lecce in 1194 – though its legacy long outlasted Norman political rule.

This beautifully illustrated title explores not only the Norman armies, but the armies of their opponents, with full-colour plates and expert analysis revealing fascinating details about the fighting men of Normandy, Byzantium, the Arab armies and more.


The Carthaginians 6 th -2 nd Century BC

Carthage, the port-city in Tunisia first settled by Phoenicians from Tyre, grew to extend a competitive maritime trading empire all over the Western Mediterranean and beyond. Because of this expansion, Carthage was defended by the best navy of the period.

In the 6th century BC this came into confrontation with Greek colonists in Sicily, starting major wars that lasted through the 5th and 4th centuries, and involved much interaction with different Greek forces.

During the 3rd century Carthage first clashed with Roman armies, and in the course of three wars that raged over Spain, Sicily and Italy the Romans suffered the greatest defeats in their early history at the hands of Hamilcar, Hannibal and Hasdrubal Barca, leading multinational armies of North Africans and Europeans.

The Contents of this book are

  • Introduction
  • Historical Reputation
  • Chronology
  • Organization
  • Tactics
  • Arms and equipment
  • Clothing & Physical Appearance
  • The Navy
  • Selected Campaigns and Battles
  • Select bibliography
  • Index

This book is an excellent short look into the Carthaginian way of life. It delves into the Clothing, Weapons, Tactics, and Navy that ruled the ancient world. The color plates and photographs are spread throughout the book with excellent descriptions. This book is extremely useful for the wargamer or figure painter as a reference book on uniforms and the Carthaginian way of life. The historian will also find this book as an excellent primer to the background and history of this important culture.


Produktdetails

Format PDF i
Kopierschutz Ja i
Family Sharing Nein i
Text-to-Speech Nein i
Seitenzahl 64 (Printausgabe)
Erscheinungsdatum 20.04.2014

II/32a Later Carthaginian 275-202 BC Cv El LH 4Ax 4Wb Sp Ps
General 1
Cavalry or elephant 1 1
Elephant or light horse 1 1
Numidians 1
Spanish scutati or ligurians 1
Gauls or spanish scutati 2 2
Lybian or poeni spearmen 3
African or spanish caetrati javelinmen 1
Slingers 1
II/32b Later Carthaginian 201-146 BC Cv Sp LH Ps
General 1 1
Cavalry 1
Poeni spearmen 6
Numidian or poeni spearmen 1 1
Javelinmen 3

Chariot Miniatures at Magister Militum :  one  DBA 2.2 Army pack  for "a" version with a couple of differences with the DBA 3.0 version.  [=59625 Blister figurines]  .


The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC

Ogni volume di 64 pag., 12 pag. di dis. artistici a col. con oltre 40 foto in bianco e nero descrive nei minimi dettagli le uniformi, le armi, l'equipaggiamento, i fregi e i distintivi di ogni Elite Force.

Carthage, the port-city in Tunisia first settled by Phoenicians from Tyre, grew to extend a competitive maritime trading empire all over the Western Mediterranean and beyond, increasingly defended by the best navy of the period. In the 6th century BC this came into confrontation with Greek colonists in Sicily, starting major wars that lasted through the 5th and 4th centuries, and involved much interaction with different Greek forces. During the 3rd century Carthage first clashed with Roman armies, and in the course of three wars that raged over Spain, Sicily and Italy the Romans suffered the greatest defeats in their early history at the hands of Hamilcar, Hannibal and Hasdrubal Barca, leading multinational armies of North Africans and Europeans.


The Carthaginians 6th–2nd Century BC

Carthage became Rome&aposs greatest and most legendary enemy under the generalship of Hannibal in battles like Cannae. During the Punic Wars, Carthage&aposs elite mercenary-professional army was ultimately defeated by Roman endurance and Scipio&aposs genius.

Carthage, the port-city in Tunisia first settled by Phoenicians from Tyre, grew to extend a competitive maritime trading empire a Carthage became Rome's greatest and most legendary enemy under the generalship of Hannibal in battles like Cannae. During the Punic Wars, Carthage's elite mercenary-professional army was ultimately defeated by Roman endurance and Scipio's genius.

Carthage, the port-city in Tunisia first settled by Phoenicians from Tyre, grew to extend a competitive maritime trading empire all over the Western Mediterranean and beyond, increasingly defended by the best navy of the period. In the 6th century BC this came into confrontation with Greek colonists in Sicily, starting major wars that lasted through the 5th and 4th centuries, and involved much interaction with different Greek forces. During the 3rd century Carthage first clashed with Roman armies, and in the course of three wars that raged over Spain, Sicily and Italy the Romans suffered the greatest defeats in their early history (e.g. Lake Trasimene and Cannae, 217 and 216 BC) at the hands of Hamilcar, Hannibal and Hasdrubal Barca, leading multinational armies of North Africans and Europeans.

It was 202 BC before Hannibal was decisively defeated by Scipio Africanus at Zama, and 146 BC before Carthage itself was finally captured and destroyed. The victors tried to wipe the memory of Carthage out of the historical record, and while Hannibal himself has attracted fascinated study, little work has been done on trying to explain the character and reconstruct the appearance of Carthaginian armies. The authors of this study present a careful synthesis of all available literary, archaeological and iconographic evidence, in the most up-to-date attempt to do so. Their findings are dramatized in a portfolio of detailed and animated color plates by Giuseppe Rava. . more


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Preceding and simultaneously with the conquest of England by Duke William, other ambitious and aggressive Norman noblemen (notably the Drengot, De Hauteville and Guiscard families) found it prudent to leave Normandy. At first taking mercenary employment with Lombard rulers then fighting the Byzantine Empire in southern Italy, many of these noblemen achieved great victories, acquired rich lands of their own, and perfected a feudal military system that lasted for 200 years. As news of the rich pickings to be had in the south spread in Normandy, they were joined by many other opportunists – typically, younger sons who could not inherit lands at home. Steadily, these Norman noblemen fought their way to local power, at first in Apulia, then across the Adriatic in Albania, and finally in Muslim Sicily, defeating in the process the armies of Byzantium, the German 'Holy Roman Empire', and Islamic regional rulers. Finally, in 1130, Roger II founded a unified kingdom incorporating southern Italy and Sicily, which lasted until the death of Tancred of Lecce in 1194 – though its legacy long outlasted Norman political rule.

This beautifully illustrated title explores not only the Norman armies, but the armies of their opponents, with full-colour plates and expert analysis revealing fascinating details about the fighting men of Normandy, Byzantium, the Arab armies and more.

Between the reigns of Augustus and Septimius Severus, the Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire frequently saw brutal fighting, most notably during the conquest of Dacia by Trajan, the suppression of the Great Revolt in Judea and intermittent clashes with Rome's great rival Parthia. In these wars, Roman soldiers had to fight in a range of different climates and terrains, from the deserts of the Middle East to the islands of the eastern Mediterranean.

Using full-colour artwork, this book examines the variation of equipment and uniforms both between different military units, and in armies stationed in different regions of the Empire. Using evidence drawn from recent archaeological finds, it paints a vivid portrait of Roman army units in the Eastern provinces in the first two centuries of the Imperial period.

Roman unit standards played a important role, both ceremonially and on the battlefield. With the armies of the late Roman Republic and early Empire continually engaged on the frontiers, the soldiers selected for the dangerous honour of carrying them were figures of particular renown and splendour.

Standard-bearers wore special armour, with the heads and pelts of animals such as bears, wolves, or even lions draped over their helmets and shoulders. The standards themselves varied greatly, from the legion's Eagle and imperial portrait image to various cohort signa, flags (vexilla) and even dragon 'windsocks' (dracones) copied from barbarian enemies and allies.

This first volume of a two-part series by Roman army expert, Rafaele D'Amato uses detailed colour plates and the latest research to examine these vital cogs in the Roman army machine that drove its soldiers to conquer the known world.


The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC

Carthage became Rome's greatest and most legendary enemy under the generalship of Hannibal in battles like Cannae. During the Punic Wars, Carthage's elite mercenary-professional army was ultimately defeated by Roman endurance and Scipio's genius.

Carthage, the port-city in Tunisia first settled by Phoenicians from Tyre, grew to extend a competitive maritime trading empire all over the Western Mediterranean and beyond, increasingly defended by the best navy of the period. In the 6th century BC this came into confrontation with Greek colonists in Sicily, starting major wars that lasted through the 5th and 4th centuries, and involved much interaction with different Greek forces. During the 3rd century Carthage first clashed with Roman armies, and in the course of three wars that raged over Spain, Sicily and Italy the Romans suffered the greatest defeats in their early history (e.g. Lake Trasimene and Cannae, 217 and 216 BC) at the hands of Hamilcar, Hannibal and Hasdrubal Barca, leading multinational armies of North Africans and Europeans.

It was 202 BC before Hannibal was decisively defeated by Scipio Africanus at Zama, and 146 BC before Carthage itself was finally captured and destroyed. The victors tried to wipe the memory of Carthage out of the historical record, and while Hannibal himself has attracted fascinated study, little work has been done on trying to explain the character and reconstruct the appearance of Carthaginian armies. The authors of this study present a careful synthesis of all available literary, archaeological and iconographic evidence, in the most up-to-date attempt to do so. Their findings are dramatized in a portfolio of detailed and animated color plates by Giuseppe Rava.

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