Aiken Technical College

Aiken Technical College

Situated on Jefferson Davis Highway in Graniteville, South Carolina, Aiken Technical College (ATC) is dedicated to providing opportunities for educational, economic, professional, social, and personal development of all they serve. This multi-service, two-year comprehensive college of higher education creates a learning environment focused on student success.The college opened its doors for the first time in 1972. Before acquiring the present name in 1977, it was named Aiken Technical Education Center.Accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the institution offers associate degrees with specialization in a wide range of subjects; diploma and number of certificate programs in high-tech, high-demand fields such as Computer Technology, Industrial Engineering Technology, Health, Public Service, and Business.Additionally, it provides Distance Education credit courses through various media and in several disciplines.To promote physical activity among the students, variety of athletics programs which include varsity basketball and varsity fast pitch softball are offered.The library at the campus contains a collection of more than 32,000 items including books, periodicals, microfiche and audiovisual material.The Career Center, Counseling Services, Student Center, Tutoring Center and Writing Center and Bookstore are other services available.In order to develop and enhance social and leadership skills, the campus promotes academic clubs, professional clubs, and personal interest clubs. With state-of-the-art facilities, the college provides hands-on opportunities for educational, social and personal development.


Libraries.org

Library details: Aiken Technical College Library is an Academic library.
This library is affiliated with Aiken Technical College (view map) . The collection of the library contains 63,438 volumes. The library circulates 7,948 items per year. The library serves a population of 1,917 FTE Enrollment.

Permalink: https://librarytechnology.org/library/13535
(Use this link to refer back to this listing.)

Administration: The director of the library is Katie Miller .

Organizational structure: The library is part of a publicly-funded organization. It operates on a Non-profit financial model.

Academic Level: The library Serves an educational institution at the Community College level. The Carnegie Foundation designates this institution as: Associate's Colleges: Mixed Transfer/Career & Technical-High Traditional (level 4).

Statistics Academic
Enrollment 1,917FTE Students
Collection size63,438volumes
Annual Circulation7,948transactions

Wireless: The library offers wireless access to the Internet. ATT Wifi

Record History: This listing was created on Jan 18, 2005 and was last modified on Mar 19, 2021.


Aiken Technical College

For South Carolina public community colleges, the average tuition is approximately $5,094 per year for in-state students and $9,919 for out-of-state students. For private community colleges, the average yearly tuition is approximately $11,507 per year. Read more about average community college tuition costs across the country.

The average community college acceptance rate in South Carolina is 67%. Read more about national community college acceptance rates.

South Carolina community colleges have a diversity score of 0.65, which is lower than the national average of 0.73. The most diverse community college in South Carolina is Midlands Technical College. Read more about community college diversity statistics in the USA.


Contents

List of colleges and universities in South Carolina
School Location(s) [8] Control Type [a] Enrollment [8]
(Fall 2010)
Enrollment [8]
(Spring 2020)
Founded Accreditation [8]
Aiken Technical College Aiken Public Associate's college 3,128 2267 1972 [9] SACS
Allen University [b] Columbia Private
(A.M.E Church)
Baccalaureate college 848 743 1870 [10] SACS
Anderson University Anderson Private
(Baptist)
Master's university 2,512 3429 1911 [11] SACS
Benedict College [c] Columbia Private
(Baptist)
Baccalaureate college 3,137 2165 1870 [12] SACS
Bob Jones University Greenville Private
(Nondenominational)
Special-focus institution 3,794 3005 1927 [13] TRACS
Central Carolina Technical College Sumter [d] Public Associate's college 4,382 3550 1962 [14] SACS
Charleston School of Law Charleston Private Special-focus institution 700 612 [15] 2003 [16] ABA
Charleston Southern University North Charleston Private
(Baptist)
Master's university 3,213 3414 1964 [17] SACS
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina Charleston Public Master's university 3,402 3763 1842 [18] SACS
Claflin University [c] Orangeburg Private
(Methodist)
Baccalaureate college 1,920 2172 1869 [19] SACS
Clemson University Clemson Public Research university 19,453 24951 1889 [20] SACS
Clinton Junior College [c] Rock Hill Private
(AME Zion)
Associate's college 143 193 1894 [21] TRACS
Coastal Carolina University Conway Public Master's university 8,706 10641 1954 [22] SACS
Coker University Hartsville Private Baccalaureate college 1,106 1280 1908 [23] SACS
College of Charleston Charleston Public Master's university 11,532 10783 1770 [3] SACS
Columbia College [e] Columbia Private
(Methodist)
Baccalaureate college 1,367 1276 1854 [24] SACS
Columbia International University Columbia Private
(Interdenominational)
Master's university 1,201 1048 1923 [25] SACS
Converse College Spartanburg Private Master's university 1,269 1380 1890 [26] SACS
Denmark Technical College [c] Denmark Public Associate's college 1,033 489 1947 [27] SACS
Erskine College Due West Private
(Presbyterian)
Baccalaureate college 811 693 1839 [28] SACS
Florence–Darlington Technical College Florence Public Associate's college 5,855 4182 1963 [29] SACS
Francis Marion University Florence Public Master's university 4,032 3940 1970 [30] SACS
Furman University Greenville Private Baccalaureate college 2,996 2947 1826 [31] SACS
Greenville Technical College Greenville [f] Public Associate's college 14,879 10864 1962 [32] SACS
Horry-Georgetown Technical College Conway [g] Public Associate's college 7,826 6788 1966 [33] SACS
Lander University Greenwood Public Baccalaureate college 3,060 3044 1872 [34] SACS
Limestone University Gaffney Private
(Interdenominational)
Baccalaureate college 3,419 2442 1845 [35] SACS
Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary

Schools based in other states offer programs at locations in South Carolina: [8]


Fall Enrollment

Fall Full-time/Part-time Fall Undergraduate Students by Full-Time and Part-Time Status
Status 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Full-Time 5,248
45%
5,252
46%
4,981
46%
4,821
45%
4,397
41%
4,239
43%
4,179
46%
3,770
43%
Part-Time 6,386
55%
6,172
54%
5,965
54%
5,928
55%
6,228
59%
5,653
57%
4,981
54%
5,024
57%
Total 11,634 11,424 10,946 10,749 10,625 9,892 9,160 8,794
Full-Time enrollment is 12 or more credit hours in the Term. Part-Time enrollment is less than 12 credit hours in the Term.
Source: SCTCS
Updated: November 9, 2020 Fall Gender

Fall Undergraduate Students by Gender
Gender 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Female 6,914
59%
6,785
59%
6,502
59%
6,492
60%
6,423
60%
5,965
60%
5,615
61%
5,556
63%
Male 4,720
41%
4,639
41%
4,444
41%
4,257
40%
4,202
40%
3,927
40%
3,545
39%
3,238
37%
Total 11,634 11,424 10,946 10,749 10,625 9,892 9,160 8,794

Full-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Gender
Gender 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Female 2,723
52%
2,798
53%
2,634
53%
2,513
52%
2,344
53%
2,242
53%
2,305
55%
2,112
56%
Male 2,525
48%
2,454
47%
2,347
47%
2,308
48%
2,053
47%
1,997
47%
1,874
45%
1,658
44%
Total 5,248 5,252 4,981 4,821 4,397 4,239 4,179 3,770

Part-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Gender
Gender 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Female 4,191
66%
3,987
65%
3,868
65%
3,979
67%
4,079
65%
3,723
66%
3,310
66%
3,444
69%
Male 2,195
34%
2,185
35%
2,097
35%
1,949
33%
2,149
35%
1,930
34%
1,671
34%
1,580
31%
Total 6,386 6,172 5,965 5,928 6,228 5,653 4,981 5,024

Source: SCTCS
Updated: November 10, 2020

Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity
All Categories Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016
Black or African American 4,223
36%
4,128
36%
3,975
36%
3,731
35%
White 6,127
53%
5,933
52%
5,568
51%
5,247
49%
Unknown 327
3%
288
3%
345
3%
685
6%
Non Resident Alien 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Hispanic/Latino 372
3%
428
4%
416
4%
460
4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 64
1%
62
1%
55
1%
42
0%
Asian 262
2%
256
2%
222
2%
227
2%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 17
0%
20
0%
13
0%
18
0%
Two or More Races 242
2%
309
3%
352
3%
339
3%
Total 11,634 11,424 10,946 10,749
Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity (Continued)
All Categories Fall 2017 Fall 2018 Fall 2019 Fall 2020
Black or African American 3,739
35%
3,430
35%
3,039
33%
3,039
35%
White 4,965
47%
4,482
45%
4,240
46%
4,030
46%
Unknown 681
6%
677
7%
587
6%
448
5%
Non Resident Alien 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Hispanic/Latino 526
5%
631
6%
614
7%
637
7%
American Indian or Alaska Native 35
0%
30
0%
28
0%
27
0%
Asian 190
2%
190
2%
207
2%
170
2%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 15
0%
9
0%
9
0%
5
0%
Two or More Races 474
4%
443
4%
436
5%
438
5%
Total 10,625 9,892 9,160 8,794

Full-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity
All Categories Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016
Black or African American 1,656
32%
1,574
30%
1,507
30%
1,333
28%
White 2,937
56%
2,994
57%
2,733
55%
2,437
51%
Unknown 153
3%
138
3%
196
4%
533
11%
Non Resident Alien 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Hispanic/Latino 177
3%
207
4%
207
4%
224
5%
American Indian or Alaska Native 31
1%
29
1%
23
0%
19
0%
Asian 143
3%
140
3%
111
2%
97
2%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 11
0%
9
0%
8
0%
8
0%
Two or More Races 140
3%
161
3%
196
4%
170
4%
Total 5,248 5,252 4,981 4,821
Full-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity (Continued)
All Categories Fall 2017 Fall 2018 Fall 2019 Fall 2020
Black or African American 1,127
26%
1,062
25%
1,064
25%
972
26%
White 2,164
49%
2,036
48%
2,041
49%
1,905
51%
Unknown 520
12%
526
12%
428
10%
268
7%
Non Resident Alien 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Hispanic/Latino 249
6%
287
7%
298
7%
306
8%
American Indian or Alaska Native 19
0%
9
0%
14
0%
13
0%
Asian 90
2%
100
2%
105
3%
87
2%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 6
0%
7
0%
5
0%
3
0%
Two or More Races 222
5%
212
5%
224
5%
216
6%
Total 4,397 4,239 4,179 3,770

Part-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity
All Categories Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016
Black or African American 2,567
40%
2,554
41%
2,468
41%
2,398
40%
White 3,190
50%
2,939
48%
2,835
48%
2,810
47%
Unknown 174
3%
150
2%
149
2%
152
3%
Non Resident Alien 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Hispanic/Latino 195
3%
221
4%
209
4%
236
4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 33
1%
33
1%
32
1%
23
0%
Asian 119
2%
116
2%
111
2%
130
2%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 6
0%
11
0%
5
0%
10
0%
Two or More Races 102
2%
11
0%
156
3%
169
3%
Total 6,386 6,172 5,965 5,928
Part-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Race/Ethnicity (Continued)
All Categories

Source: MTC Data Warehouse
Updated: December 1, 2020

Fall Age

Fall Undergraduate Students by Age
Age Categories 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Average
Full-Time
Student Age
26.1 25.2 25.2 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.4 24.1
19 and Under 2,966
25%
3,182
28%
3,199
29%
3,424
32%
3,448
32%
3,426
35%
3,240
35%
3,183
36%
20-24 3,978
34%
3,889
34%
3,709
34%
3,536
33%
3,444
32%
3,134
32%
2,917
32%
2,813
32%
25-29 1,633
14%
1,612
14%
1,474
13%
1,441
13%
1,433
13%
1,306
13%
1,170
13%
1,058
12%
30-39 1,736
15%
1,633
14%
1,543
14%
1,439
13%
1,377
13%
1,189
12%
1,070
12%
1,068
12%
40-49 850
7%
730
6%
679
6%
609
6%
631
6%
570
6%
509
6%
481
5%
50 and over 470
4%
378
3%
342
3%
300
3%
292
3%
267
3%
254
3%
191
2%
Unknown 1
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Total 11,634 11,424 10,946 10,749 10,625 9,892 9,160 8,794
Full-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Age
Age 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Average
Full-Time
Student Age
23.5 22.7 22.6 22.3 22.0 22.2 21.7 21.7
19 and Under 2,056
39%
2,190
42%
2,136
43%
2,212
46%
2,138
49%
2,150
51%
2,152
51%
1,882
50%
20-24 1,874
36%
1,834
35%
1,705
34%
1,592
33%
1,395
32%
1,265
30%
1,269
30%
1,208
32%
25-29 514
10%
543
10%
497
10%
426
9%
377
9%
361
9%
343
8%
306
8%
30-39 438
8%
448
9%
414
8%
389
8%
318
7%
302
7%
274
7%
244
6%
40-49 220
4%
167
3%
169
3%
149
3%
128
3%
118
3%
96
2%
97
3%
50 and over 146
3%
70
1%
60
1%
53
1%
41
1%
43
1%
45
1%
33
1%
Unknown 0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Total 5,248 5,252 4,981 4,821 4,397 4,239 4,179 3,770
Part-Time Fall Undergraduate Students by Age
Age 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Average
Part-Time
Student Age
28.3 27.8 27.4 26.9 26.8 26.8 26.6 25.9
19 and Under 910
14%
992
16%
1,063
18%
1,212
20%
1,310
21%
1,276
23%
1,088
22%
1,301
26%
20-24 2,104
33%
2,055
33%
2,004
34%
1,944
33%
2,049
33%
1,869
33%
1,648
33%
1,605
32%
25-29 1,119
18%
1,069
17%
977
16%
1,015
17%
1,056
17%
945
17%
827
17%
752
15%
30-39 1,298
20%
1,185
19%
1,129
19%
1,050
18%
1,059
17%
887
16%
796
16%
824
16%
40-49 630
10%
563
9%
510
9%
460
8%
503
8%
452
8%
413
8%
384
8%
50 and over 324
5%
308
5%
282
5%
247
4%
251
4%
224
4%
209
4%
158
3%
Unknown 1
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
Total 6,386 6,172 5,965 5,928 6,228 5,653 4,981 5,024

Source: IPEDS and MTC Data Warehouse
Note: Percentage total may be slightly higher/lower due to rounding.
Updated: December 1, 2020


Contents

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 20.8 square miles (54.0 km 2 ), of which 20.7 square miles (53.6 km 2 ) is land and 0.15 square miles (0.4 km 2 ), or 0.68%, is water. [13]

Aiken has a humid subtropical climate characterized by hot, humid summers and cool, dry winters, but experiences milder temperatures throughout the year than the rest of the state. Precipitation is distributed relatively uniformly throughout the year, with mostly rain in the milder months and occasional snow in the winter. The coldest recorded temperature was −4 °F or −20 °C on January 21, 1985 and the hottest 109 °F or 42.8 °C on August 21, 1983.

Climate data for Aiken 5 SE, South Carolina (1981–2010 normals, extremes 1893–present [a] )
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 82
(28)
88
(31)
93
(34)
99
(37)
106
(41)
108
(42)
108
(42)
109
(43)
106
(41)
99
(37)
88
(31)
85
(29)
109
(43)
Average high °F (°C) 54.9
(12.7)
59.9
(15.5)
67.5
(19.7)
76.0
(24.4)
83.5
(28.6)
89.5
(31.9)
92.3
(33.5)
90.5
(32.5)
84.8
(29.3)
75.5
(24.2)
67.0
(19.4)
57.5
(14.2)
74.9
(23.8)
Average low °F (°C) 32.7
(0.4)
36.3
(2.4)
42.4
(5.8)
50.7
(10.4)
59.7
(15.4)
68.2
(20.1)
71.6
(22.0)
70.5
(21.4)
63.5
(17.5)
51.6
(10.9)
42.2
(5.7)
34.5
(1.4)
52.0
(11.1)
Record low °F (°C) −4
(−20)
6
(−14)
13
(−11)
21
(−6)
34
(1)
42
(6)
51
(11)
52
(11)
37
(3)
25
(−4)
11
(−12)
4
(−16)
−4
(−20)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.74
(120)
4.20
(107)
4.86
(123)
3.11
(79)
3.83
(97)
5.46
(139)
5.10
(130)
5.25
(133)
3.80
(97)
3.38
(86)
3.64
(92)
3.78
(96)
51.15
(1,299)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.5
(1.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.5
(1.3)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 9.2 8.1 7.9 6.8 6.8 10.1 10.5 10.5 7.2 6.2 6.9 8.6 98.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 0.2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2
Source: NOAA [15] [16] [17]
Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,817
18902,362 30.0%
19003,414 44.5%
19103,911 14.6%
19204,103 4.9%
19306,033 47.0%
19406,168 2.2%
19507,083 14.8%
196011,243 58.7%
197013,436 19.5%
198014,978 11.5%
199019,872 32.7%
200025,337 27.5%
201029,566 16.7%
2019 (est.)30,869 [5] 4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census [6] of 2010, there were 29,524 people and 12,773 households with a population density was 1,416.3 people per square mile (604.6/km 2 ). There were 14,162 housing units at an average density of 703.1 per square mile (271.4/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the city was 66.8% White, 28.5% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 2.6% of the population.

There were 10,287 households, out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.9% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 23.2% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $49,100, and the median income for a family was $63,520. Males had a median income of $51,988 versus $28,009 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,129. About 10.1% of families and 14.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.0% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

Between 1890 and the 1920s, many Jewish immigrants settled in Aiken. The Jewish immigrants were from Eastern Europe, including Russia and Poland. Many were from Knyszyn, Poland. In 1905, a group of Russian-Jewish socialists from New York founded a farming colony in Aiken County that was known as "Happyville". Adath (Adas) Yeshurun (Congregation of Israel) Synagogue was chartered in Aiken in 1921 and the cornerstone was laid in 1925. An historical marker was added to the synagogue in 2014, sponsored by the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina. [18] [19] [20] [21]

Aiken is governed via a mayor-council system. A mayor is elected at-large. The city council consists of six members. All six members are elected from single member districts.

  • Mayor: Rick Osbon
  • District 1: Gail Diggs
  • District 2: Lessie Price
  • District 3: Dick Dewar
  • District 4: Ed Girardeau
  • District 5: Andrea Neira Gregory
  • District 6: Ed Woltz

The municipality of Aiken was incorporated on December 19, 1835. The community formed around the terminus of the South Carolina Canal and Railroad Company, a rail line from Charleston to the Savannah River, and was named for William Aiken, the railroad's first president.

Originally it was in the Edgefield District. With population increases, in 1871 Aiken County was organized, made up of parts of neighboring counties. Among its founding commissioners were three African-American legislators: Prince Rivers Samuel J. Lee, speaker of the state House and the first black man admitted to the South Carolina Bar and Charles D. Hayne, a free man of color from one of Charleston's elite families. [22]

Aiken was a planned town, and many of the streets in the historic district are named for other cities and counties in South Carolina, including Abbeville, Barnwell, Beaufort, Chesterfield, Colleton, Columbia, Dillon, Edgefield, Edisto, Fairfield, Florence, Greenville, Hampton, Horry, Jasper, Kershaw, Lancaster, Laurens, Marion, Marlboro, McCormick, Newberry, Orangeburg, Pendleton, Pickens, Richland, Sumter, Union, Williamsburg and York.

In the late 19th century, Aiken gained fame as a wintering spot for wealthy people from the Northeast. Thomas Hitchcock, Sr. and William C. Whitney established the Aiken Winter Colony. Over the years Aiken became a winter home for many notable people, including George H. Bostwick, James B. Eustis, Madeleine Astor, William Kissam Vanderbilt, Eugene Grace, president of Bethlehem Steel, Allan Pinkerton, and W. Averell Harriman.

Savannah River Plant Edit

The United States Atomic Energy Commission's selection of a site near Aiken for a plant to produce fuel for thermonuclear weapons was announced on November 30, 1950. Residences and businesses at Ellenton, South Carolina, were bought for use for the plant site. Residents were moved to New Ellenton, which was constructed about eight miles north, or to neighboring towns.

The site was named the Savannah River Plant, and renamed the Savannah River Site in 1989. The facility contains five production reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, a research laboratory, heavy water production facilities, two fuel reprocessing facilities and tritium recovery facilities.

  • Aiken Golf Club
  • Aiken Polo Club
  • Hopelands Gardens [23][24]
  • Palmetto Golf Club
  • Hitchcock Woods mansion
  • The Aiken Colored Cemetery, Aiken Mile Track, Aiken Training Track, Aiken Winter Colony Historic District I, Aiken Winter Colony Historic District II, Aiken Winter Colony Historic District III, Chancellor James P. Carroll House, Chinaberry, Coker Spring, Court Tennis Building, Crossways, Dawson-Vanderhorst House, Immanuel School, Joye Cottage, Legare-Morgan House, Phelps House, Pickens House, St. Mary Help of Christians Church, St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church, Charles E. Simons, Jr. Federal Court House, Whitehall, and Willcox's are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [25]

Schools Edit

  • Public schools:
    • Aiken Elementary School
    • Aiken Middle School
    • Aiken Scholars Academy [26]
    • Chukker Creek Elementary
    • East Aiken School of the Arts
    • JD Lever Elementary School
    • Jackson STEM Middle School
    • Lloyd Kennedy Charter School
    • Millbrook Elementary School
    • North Aiken Elementary School
    • Redcliffe Elementary School
    • Schofield Middle School
    • Silver Bluff High School
    • Aiken Christian School
    • Palmetto Academy Day School
    • St. Mary Help of Christians Catholic School
    • Second Baptist Christian Preparatory School
    • South Aiken Baptist Christian School
    • Town Creek Christian Academy [27]
    • Lloyd Kennedy Charter School
    • Tall Pines Stem Academy
    • Horse Creek Academy

    Colleges and universities Edit

    Library Edit

    Aiken has a public library, a branch of the ABBE Regional Library System. [28]

    The Aiken Steeplechase Association, [29] founded in 1930, hosts the Imperial Cup each March and the Holiday Cup in October, both races sanctioned by the National Steeplechase Association. This event draws more than 30,000 spectators.

    The Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum was established in 1977 as a tribute to the famous flat racing and steeplechase thoroughbred horses trained at the Aiken Training Track. [30]

    Other events Edit

    Aiken hosts many polo matches at its numerous polo fields. Other local events include:

    • Aiken Triple Crown
    • Aiken's Makin'
    • Battle of Aiken Reenactment
    • Bluegrass Festival
    • Fall Steeplechase
    • Hops & Hogs
    • The Lobster Races
    • Western Carolina State Fair
    • The Whiskey Road Race
    • Aiken City Limits (ACL)
    • Aiken Center for Arts - Hosts educational classes, fine arts gallery, and exhibition opportunities.
    • Aiken County Farmers Market - The oldest food market in South Carolina.
    • Aiken County Historical Museum - A living museum, also known as "Banksia" after the banksia rose, displays special exhibits of items from residents.
    • Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum - Displays the area's rich thoroughbred history with memorabilia, photography, and trophies.
    • Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum - The railroad depot is on the second floor and had nine dioramas depicting railroad history.
    • Center for African American History, Art and Culture - Hosts special events of African American history.
    • DuPont Planetarium and RPSEC Observatory - Provides live presentations of stars, constellation, and visible planets.
    • Hitchcock Woods - One of the largest urban forests in the United States, at 2100 acres. Provides hiking, walking and equestrian trails. [31]
    • Juilliard in Aiken - Live artistic performances, classes, lectures, and workshops. - slaves' and owners' lives depicted.
    • Rose Hill Estate - Historic housing for overnight stay, weddings, reunions, meetings, and dinner parties.

    In the late 19th century and the first part of the 20th century, Aiken served as a winter playground for many of the country's wealthiest families, such as the Vanderbilts, Bostwicks, and the Whitneys.

      (1951–1991), Republican strategist, advisor to Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush raised in Aiken (1904-1974), U.S. diplomat raised in Aiken (1909–1982), court tennis player, steeplechasejockey and horse trainer, eight-goal polo player "Pete" was grandson of Jabez A. Bostwick, wealthy Standard Oil partner , actress, played Sarah Newlin in the HBO series True Blood and Aubrey in the film Pitch Perfect , boxer, member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame , NFL player for the Denver Broncos , NFL player , equestrian, heir to the Singer Sewing Machine Company fortune (1842–1874), born in Aiken, U. S. Representative from South Carolina [32] , American novelist and short story writer. , first African-American woman licensed to practice medicine in South Carolina and wife Louise owned a 3,000-acre (12 km 2 ) estate near Aiken where in 1892 he founded the Palmetto Golf Club in 1916, Louise founded Aiken Preparatory School. They built a steeplechase training center [33] and in 1939 founded Hitchcock Woods with 1,191 acres of their estate. [34] (1900–1944), son of Thomas and Louise Hitchcock, born in Aiken polo player veteran of the Lafayette Escadrille in World War I, killed in World War II. , wife of Charles Oliver Iselin and original owner of Hopeland Gardens in Aiken , PGA Tour Golfer , American footballlinebacker for the Dallas Cowboys , Southern Baptistclergyman, began pastorate at Bethel Baptist Church in Aiken in 1960 , grandson of Charles Steele, a senior partner at J. P. Morgan & Company, a 10-goal polo player and one of what was known as the Big Four in international polo , First African-American woman to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy (1980) , author of Fundamentals of Ecology, founded Savannah River Ecology Laboratory south of Aiken to study ecological impacts of the nuclear facility , former NFL defensive lineman, six-time Pro Bowl selection (1989–91, 93–94, 96), NCAA first-team All-American (1987)
  • William Refrigerator Perry, former NFL defensive lineman with Super Bowl XX champion Chicago Bears and 3-time NCAA All-American (1982–1984) , financier who purchased William Kissam Vanderbilt's cottage Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island (b. 1930), past president of National Ladies Auxiliary of Jewish War Veterans her father, Herbert B. Ram, [35] owned and named Patricia Theater in downtown Aiken after her, [36] and the companion Rosemary Theater [37] was named for her sister. [38] , silver medalist, triple jump, 1992 Summer Olympics (1916-2020), lawyer, United States diplomat, and South Carolina state senator , gymnast , athlete, linebacker with San Francisco 49ers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers , helped establish "Winter Colony," a 69-room winter residence (Big Show) (b. 1972), professional wrestler and actor, seven-time world champion in wrestling (b. 1983), professional football player (1895–1968), writer, coined phrase "pornography of violence" in her Spanish Civil War memoir, Death's Other Kingdom (also published as Malaga Burning), born in Aiken , novelist and poet, born in Aiken
  • The Southside is Aiken's southern portion, which strongly increased in development after the construction of the Savannah River Site. It now serves as Aiken County's premiere shopping district, comprising the Aiken Mall, multiple retail stores, and several restaurants. Two large residential communities, Houndslake Country Club and Woodside Plantation, have multiple golf courses within the communities. Many newcomers take up residence in either Houndslake or Woodside, but the most prestigious homes are in historic downtown Aiken.


    Contents

    The original land area was approximately 772 acres. The city was incorporated in 1906 and sprouted from the pre-Civil War city of Hamburg. James U. Jackson was the city's primary visionary. He traveled to New York several times to receive financial support for the town and built the Thirteenth Street/ Georgia Avenue Bridge (James U. Jackson Memorial Bridge). [7]

    In the early 20th century North Augusta was a popular vacation spot for northerners. Its popularity stemmed from its railroad connections and climate. In the Mid 20th century after the atomic bomb and during the Cold War, the city's population nearly quadrupled because the Savannah River Plant was constructed south of town. During this period the area of North Augusta increased from 772 acres to 5,139 acres. [7]

    North Augusta is also notable for nearby Murphy Village, a community of about 2,500 Irish Travelers that was featured on a 2012 episode of the TLC show, My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding. [9] [10]

    The Riverview Park Activities Center is located in North Augusta along the Savannah River. Riverview Park is the host site for Nike's annual premier summer events, the Nike Peach Jam (boys) and the Nike Nationals (girls). The nation's top high school basketball prospects and college coaches gather in North Augusta each year for the tournaments.

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 20.5 square miles (53.1 km 2 ), of which 20.0 square miles (51.9 km 2 ) is land and 0.46 square miles (1.2 km 2 ), or 2.25%, is water. [6]

    Highways Edit

    • I-20
    • I-520
    • US 1
    • US 25
    • US 25 Bus.
    • US 78
    • US 278
    • SC 121
    • SC 125
    • SC 126
    • SC 230

    North Augusta public schools includes two high schools, North Augusta High School and Fox Creek High School. North Augusta High School is in Aiken County and operates under the Aiken County School District. Fox Creek is an independent charter school.

    Two middle schools, Paul Knox Middle School and North Augusta Middle School, and four elementary schools (Hammond Hill Elementary, Belvedere Elementary, North Augusta Elementary, and the newest, Mossy Creek Elementary), serve the community. Local private schools include Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church, Victory Baptist Church, and kindergartens at Grace United Methodist Church and First Baptist Church North Augusta. Many students attend private schools across the river in Georgia, at Aquinas High School, Augusta Preparatory Day School, Augusta Christian, Curtis Baptist, Episcopal Day School, Saint Mary on the Hill Catholic School, and Westminster Schools of Augusta.

    North Augusta has a public library, a branch of the ABBE Regional Library System. [12]

    Historical population
    Census Pop.
    19101,136
    19201,742 53.3%
    19302,003 15.0%
    19402,629 31.3%
    19503,659 39.2%
    196010,348 182.8%
    197012,883 24.5%
    198013,593 5.5%
    199015,351 12.9%
    200017,574 14.5%
    201021,348 21.5%
    2019 (est.)23,845 [3] 11.7%
    U.S. Decennial Census [13]
    2018 Estimate [14]

    As of the census [4] of 2010, there were 21,348 people, 9,003 households, and 4,764 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,213 people per square mile (508.7/km 2 ). There were 9,726 housing units at an average density of 552.6 per square mile (213.8/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the city was 74.2% White, 20.4% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2% from other races, and 2% from two or more ethnic groups. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.2% of the population.

    In 2000, there were 7,330 households, out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.96.

    In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.2% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.

    The median income for a household in the city was $45,600, and the median income for a family was $58,472. Males had a median income of $42,089 versus $28,790 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,099. About 9.8% of families and 11.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.6% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over.


    Accreditation and Licensing for Trade Schools

    Students should check each prospective trade program’s accreditation and licensing status before applying. Attending an accredited and licensed school ensures students receive an education that prepares them for the workforce.

    Accredited schools must meet high standards. Independent accrediting agencies grant accreditation after an extensive review process. During the review, the accrediting agency evaluates factors including student learning outcomes, faculty qualifications, and academic mission. Only schools that successfully complete the process earn accreditation. This resource provides information about the accreditation process.

    Attending an accredited school ensures students receive a quality education. Credits earned from an accredited institution are more likely to transfer to other schools, and the requirements for many professional licenses and certifications include a degree from an accredited institution. Additionally, only students at accredited schools can receive federal financial aid.

    Schools can hold national or regional accreditation. Community colleges and four-year universities typically earn regional accreditation. In South Carolina, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges awards regional accreditation.

    Trade and vocational schools in South Carolina often pursue national accreditation from a specialized agency such as the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges. Other specialized accrediting agencies include the Distance Education Accrediting Commission, which evaluates online schools. Both national and regional accrediting agencies should hold approval from the Department of Education.

    In addition to accreditation, postsecondary institutions must hold a state license. The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education oversees two-year colleges, technical colleges, and other degree-granting schools in the state.


    Burke County, Georgia

    Burke County is an original county of Georgia, created February 5, 1777, and named for English political writer, Edmund Burke, a Member of Parliament in the Whig Party who favored conciliation with the colonies. [4] In 1779, Col. John Twiggs and brothers Col. William Few and Benjamin Few, along with 250 men, defeated British in the Battle of Burke Jail.

    Burke County is located within the CSRA (the Central Savannah River Area). During the antebellum period, it was developed by slave labor for large cotton plantations. The county was majority African American in population in this period, as slaveholders wanted high numbers of slaves for laborers to cultivate and process cotton.

    The military tradition continued during the American Civil War, when Burke County provided volunteers for numerous units: the 2nd Regiment Georgia Infantry Company D (Burke Sharpshooters), 3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry Company A (Burke Guards), 32nd Regiment Georgia Infantry Company C (Williams Volunteers), 32nd Regiment Georgia Infantry Company K (Alexander Greys), 48th Regiment Georgia Infantry Company D (Burke Volunteers), Cobb's Legion Infantry company E (Poythress Volunteers), and the Cobb's Legion Cavalry Company F (Grubb's Hussars).

    Agriculture continued as the basis of the economy for decades after the American Civil War, when most freedmen worked as sharecroppers or tenant farmers. Cotton was the major commodity crop. [5] In the early 20th century, mechanization of agriculture caused many African-American farm workers to lose their jobs.

    As can be seen from the census tables below, the county lost population from 1910 to 1920, and from 1930 to 1970. Part of the decline was related to the Great Migration, as millions of African Americans left the rural South and Jim Crow oppression for jobs and opportunities in industrial cities of the Midwest, North. From World War II on, primary migration destinations were West Coast cities because of the buildup of the defense industry. In addition, whites left rural areas for industrial jobs in the North, in cities such as Chicago and Detroit.

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 835 square miles (2,160 km 2 ), of which 827 square miles (2,140 km 2 ) is land and 8.0 square miles (21 km 2 ) (1.0%) is water. [6] It is the second-largest county by area in Georgia.

    The southern half of Burke County, defined by a line running along State Route 80 to Waynesboro, then southeast to east of Perkins, is located in the Upper Ogeechee River sub-basin of the Ogeechee River basin. North of Waynesboro, and bordered on the north by a line running from Keysville southeast to Girard, the territory is part of the Brier Creek sub-basin of the Savannah River basin. The most northern sliver of Burke County is located in the Middle Savannah River sub-basin of the same Savannah River basin. [7]

    Major highways Edit

    Adjacent counties Edit

    Historical population
    Census Pop.
    17909,467
    18009,504 0.4%
    181010,858 14.2%
    182011,577 6.6%
    183011,833 2.2%
    184013,176 11.3%
    185016,100 22.2%
    186017,165 6.6%
    187017,679 3.0%
    188027,128 53.4%
    189028,501 5.1%
    190030,165 5.8%
    191027,268 −9.6%
    192030,836 13.1%
    193029,224 −5.2%
    194026,520 −9.3%
    195023,458 −11.5%
    196020,596 −12.2%
    197018,255 −11.4%
    198019,349 6.0%
    199020,579 6.4%
    200022,243 8.1%
    201023,316 4.8%
    2019 (est.)22,383 [8] −4.0%
    U.S. Decennial Census [9]
    1790-1960 [10] 1900-1990 [11]
    1990-2000 [12]

    2010 census Edit

    As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 23,316 people, 8,533 households, and 6,110 families living in the county. [13] The population density was 28.2 inhabitants per square mile (10.9/km 2 ). There were 9,865 housing units at an average density of 11.9 per square mile (4.6/km 2 ). [14] As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 23,316 people living in the county. 49.5% were Black or African American, 47.5% White, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from some other race and 1.3% from two or more races. 2.6% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race). [15]

    In terms of ancestry, 49.5% have some African ancestry, 11.0% identify as of American, 9.3% are Irish, 5.5% were English, and 5.1% were German. [16]

    Of the 8,533 households, 39.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 24.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.4% were non-families, and 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.20. The median age was 35.9 years. [13]

    The median income for a household in the county was $33,155 and the median income for a family was $41,659. Males had a median income of $37,061 versus $24,952 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,934. About 20.0% of families and 25.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.0% of those under age 18 and 16.2% of those age 65 or over. [17]

    2000 census Edit

    As of the census [18] of 2000, there were 22,243 people, 7,934 households, and 5,799 families living in the county. The population density was 27 people per square mile (10/km 2 ). There were 8,842 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the county was 51.0% Black or African American, 46.9% White, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. 1.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

    There were 7,934 households, out of which 38.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.40% were married couples living together, 22.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.90% were non-families. 23.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.27.

    In the county, the population was spread out, with 31.30% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 21.40% from 45 to 64, and 10.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.60 males.

    The median income for a household in the county was $27,877, and the median income for a family was $31,660. Males had a median income of $29,992 and females had an income of $19,008. The per capita income for the county was $13,136. About 23.80% of families and 28.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 39.00% of those under age 18 and 29.80% of those age 65 or over.

    Burke County was traditionally a swing county in federal politics. It voted for the winner of the presidential election between 1984 and 2012, with the exception of the disputed 2000 election, which was won by Republican George W. Bush despite Burke voting for Democrat Al Gore. However, it was carried by Hillary Clinton, the loser of the 2016 election, and in 2020, it was flipped by Donald Trump, who ultimately lost Georgia and the nationwide election.


    Contents

    In the colonial era the area that is now Aiken County was part of the Orangeburgh District. The majority of the population were immigrant farmers. Most of whom were from the rural parts of Lincolnshire, England however, very few were from the town of Lincoln. Virtually all of the farmers from Lincolnshire came to the colony as indentured servants in the 1730s and 1740s. However, by the 1750s, almost all of the Lincolnshire settlers in what is now Aiken County were living on their own private land, almost exclusively engaging in subsistence agriculture on smallholding farms. Many immigrants also came from the rural eastern half of the English county of Nottinghamshire. Specifically, many indentured servants came from the towns of Newark-on-Trent, Winthorpe, Coddington, Balderton, Kelham and Farndon. A third group of English farmers settled in the colony, mostly arriving not as individual indentured servants but as entire family units, coming from the Derbyshire Dales region of the English county of Derbyshire these settlers primarily originated in the three towns of Ashbourne, Bakewell and Matlock as well as the farm country surrounding these towns. A numerically smaller but influential migration came in the form of Presbyterian immigrants of Scottish ancestry who came from County Antrim and the northern portion of County Down in Ireland, as well as small numbers from the town of Kesh in County Fermanagh, Ireland. This population referred to themselves as "Ulstermen" and "Irish Presbyterians" but were known in the colonies as "Scots-Irish" settlers, though this was not a term they self-applied. [3] [4] [5] [6] The area that has since become Aiken County had a significantly high number of first generation British immigrants who fought for the Patriot cause in the revolutionary war. [7]

    Both Aiken County and its county seat of Aiken are named after William Aiken (1779–1831), the first president of the South Carolina Railroad Company. [8] Aiken County was organized during the Reconstruction era in 1871 from portions of Barnwell, Edgefield, Lexington, and Orangeburg counties. [9]

    Prince Rivers, a freedman and state legislator from Edgefield County, had been a leader in the United States Colored Troops. He was named to head the commission that drew the new county's boundary lines. He was dubbed "The Black Prince" by local newspapers, including the Edgefield Advertiser. He also led the commission that selected the site of Aiken County's present-day courthouse. Other freedmen who were part of the founding of the county were Samuel J. Lee, speaker of the state House and the first black man admitted to the South Carolina Bar and Charles D. Hayne, a free man of color from one of Charleston's elite families. [10]

    Political tensions kept rising in South Carolina during the 1870s, especially around elections. In the months before the 1876 elections, Aiken County was one of the areas to suffer white paramilitary Red Shirts attacks and violence directed against black Republicans to suppress the black vote. Between the Hamburg Massacre in July and several days of rioting in September in Ellenton, more than 100 black men were killed by white paramilitary groups in this county. Two white men died in the violence. [10]

    In the late 19th century, the county became a popular winter refuge for affluent Northerners, who built luxury housing. The county remains popular with horse trainers and professional riders because mild winters allow lengthy training seasons.

    In the 1950s, Aiken County (along with the nearby counties of Allendale and Barnwell) was chosen as the location for storage and production of nuclear materials and various fissile materials, now known as the Savannah River Site. Ellenton, South Carolina was acquired and its buildings demolished for its development of this plant. Its residents and businesses were all moved north about eight miles to New Ellenton. Developed during Cold War tensions, the facility is scheduled for decommissioning of various parts of the site. [9]

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,081 square miles (2,800 km 2 ), of which 1,071 square miles (2,770 km 2 ) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km 2 ) (0.9%) is water. [11] It is the fourth-largest county in South Carolina by land area.

    Adjacent counties Edit

    Major highways Edit

    Historical population
    Census Pop.
    188028,112
    189031,822 13.2%
    190039,032 22.7%
    191041,849 7.2%
    192045,574 8.9%
    193047,403 4.0%
    194049,916 5.3%
    195053,137 6.5%
    196081,038 52.5%
    197091,023 12.3%
    1980105,625 16.0%
    1990120,940 14.5%
    2000142,552 17.9%
    2010160,099 12.3%
    2019 (est.)170,872 [12] 6.7%
    U.S. Decennial Census [13]
    1790-1960 [14] 1900-1990 [15]
    1990-2000 [16] 2010-2013 [1]

    2000 census Edit

    As of the census [17] of 2000, there were 142,552 people, 55,587 households, and 39,411 families living in the county. The population density was 133 inhabitants per square mile (51/km 2 ). There were 61,987 housing units at an average density of 58 per square mile (22/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the county was 71.37% White, 25.56% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, and 1.18% from two or more races. 2.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.0% were of American, 9.7% English, 8.4% German and 7.9% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

    There were 55,587 households, out of which 33.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.30% were married couples living together, 13.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.10% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.03.

    In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.20% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.20 males.

    The median income for a household in the county was $37,889, and the median income for a family was $45,769. Males had a median income of $36,743 versus $23,810 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,772. About 10.60% of families and 13.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.90% of those under age 18 and 12.50% of those age 65 or over. [18]

    2010 census Edit

    As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 160,099 people, 64,253 households, and 43,931 families living in the county. [19] The population density was 149.5 inhabitants per square mile (57.7/km 2 ). There were 72,249 housing units at an average density of 67.5 per square mile (26.1/km 2 ). [20] The racial makeup of the county was 69.6% white, 24.6% black or African American, 0.8% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 2.6% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.9% of the population. [19] In terms of ancestry, 20.6% were American, 10.0% were English, 9.9% were German, and 8.6% were Irish. [21]

    Of the 64,253 households, 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 14.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.6% were non-families, and 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.96. The median age was 40.0 years. [19]

    The median income for a household in the county was $44,468 and the median income for a family was $57,064. Males had a median income of $44,436 versus $33,207 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,172. About 13.4% of families and 16.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.7% of those under age 18 and 13.3% of those age 65 or over. [22]

    The following is from the 2010 Census Total Population : 160,099 (100.00%)

    Population by Race American Indian and Alaska native alone 682 (0.43%) Asian alone 1,329 (0.83%) Black or African American alone 39,354 (24.58%) Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific native alone 61 (0.04%) Some other race alone 4,126 (2.58%) Two or more races 3,090 (1.93%) White alone 111,457 (69.62%)

    Population by Hispanic or Latino Origin (of any race) Persons Not of Hispanic or Latino Origin 152,275 (95.11%) Persons of Hispanic or Latino Origin 7,824 (4.89%)

    Population by Gender Female 82,549 (51.56%) Male 77,550 (48.44%)

    Population by Age Persons 0 to 4 years 10,046 (6.27%) Persons 5 to 17 years 26,782 (16.73%) Persons 18 to 64 years (98,652) 61.62% Persons 65 years and over 24,619 (15.38%) [23]

    Gary Bunker is the Chairman of the Aiken County Council. The other members and their districts are as follows: [24]

    • Kathy Rawls- District 1
    • Camille Furgiuele - District 2
    • Danny Feagin - District 3
    • Chuck Smith- District 4
    • Sandy Haskell- District 5
    • Phil Napier - District 6
    • Andrew Siders - District 7
    • Willar H. Hightower Jr.- District 8 [25]
    • Mike Hunt- Aiken County Sheriff [26]

    Politics Edit

    Aiken County has long been a Republican stronghold, not supporting even southern Democrats Lyndon Johnson of Texas, Jimmy Carter of Georgia, Bill Clinton of Arkansas or Al Gore of Tennessee. However, it has trended more liberal in recent years, giving Bob Dole in 1996 a greater proportion of the vote than Donald Trump in 2016, despite Dole losing decisively to Bill Clinton nationally, and Donald Trump narrowly winning the Electoral College.


    Watch the video: Aiken Technical College 2019 Commencement Ceremony